Physical Literacy News

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Picture by: Milford Mercury 

A project designed to get children off the sofa and onto the playground is transforming lives in Milford Haven. Rebecca Evans AM, minister for social services and public health, visited the Meads Infant and Nursery School to see the impact of its innovative SKIP project.

Developed in America, SKIP (successful kinesthetic instruction for pre-schoolers) aims to get children moving and learning through play. With children spending more time in front of a TV, and less time running, skipping and jumping, many are not developing core strength and co-ordination needed to complete everyday tasks, such as sitting up in class, or throwing and catching.

The Meads was one of 100 schools to trial the innovative scheme, which has already helped youngsters improve their skills, confidence, and concentration in the classroom. Teachers and parents have been trained to deliver the program, with bags of play equipment handed out to parents.

Mum Gemma Mason said the bags were full of good ideas on how to keep her children active when not in school. Praising the scheme, she said: “it works with the children at their level, helping them develop without pushing them too hard, and most importantly it’s fun”.

Sonja Groves, acting head-teacher, said the improvement in pupils’ skills, and their physical wellbeing had been “overwhelming”.

For further information about SKIP, please visit our website or contact Dr Nalda Wainwright n.wainwright@uwtsd.ac.uk 

Original article by Joanna Sayers, 01437 761764, jsa@westerntelegraph.co.uk

Picture: Milford Mercury

 

Scanned version of original article

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